For Seniors

Home Automation for Seniors

Assisted living facilities offer an appealing solution for many seniors, but smart home automation can make independent living comfortable and help with the everyday tasks of home management. From smart thermostats and light switches that respond to the sound of your voice to refrigerators that restock themselves, stock up on these smart devices to keep you or your loved one in your home for longer. Door Locks and Security Systems Smart door locks and security system technology is at the forefront of the independent living initiative. It’s the top tool to protect your home and give your family peace of mind. A smart security system allows your family to monitor entrance activity to your home, so they’ll always know you’re safe. Smart door locks let you lock your door no matter where you are. Give multiple security codes to caregivers and family members so you never have to worry about leaving spare keys or being away when visitors swing by. Smart Doorbell Most smart doorbells come with video surveillance, speakers and microphones for added home protection. Communicate with visitors from anywhere inside of your home to let them know that you’re available and on your way to greet them. If you’re hearing impaired, set up vibrational alerts on your smartphone so you’re always alerted when someone’s at the front door. In case of suspicious activity, view and record visitors at your door from your smartphone or tablet. Wifi Enabled Refrigerators Your smart refrigerator keeps track of your grocery list and delivers it to a participating grocery store near you. When you’re ready to see what you have on-hand, view the inside of your refrigerator from an app on your smartphone and receive notifications if your refrigerator needs maintenance. Automatic Stove Turn-Off Devices Have you ever wondered if you remembered to turn the stove off after you’ve left your home? Home automation technology could be your solution. Automatic Stove turn-off devices come with a timer, motion sensors and an automatic shut-off feature to ensure that your kitchen equipment powers down when you want it to. Set a time limit of up to 40 minutes, and your stove will automatically power down for your safety and convenience. Automatic Medication Dispenser You rely on your medications to keep you at your best. Automatic medication dispensers can ensure all of your medications are taken on schedule and according to the doctor’s orders. Your dispenser alerts you or your family of missed medications and even provides your physician with detailed reports regarding your medication activity. Smart Home Hub Living on your own is simple and convenient with a central smart home hub to command all of your smart devices. Sync your smart thermostat, entertainment system, light switches and more to your smart home hub to connect all your smart devices to a central all-in-one unit. You’ll be able to control all of your technology from the comfort of your living or bedroom. Also, easily give your family quick access to all your smart devices whenever they come to visit. Smart Thermostat Enhance the quality of living in your home with a thermostat that learns from your behaviors and gives you remote access. Conveniently pre-program your smart thermostat for when indoor or outdoor temperatures reach a certain degree and save money by tracking your energy consumption as you go. Many Smart Thermostats use easy-to-read LCD touch screens for effortless use, while standard thermostats can be confusing or difficult to read. Access your Smart Thermostat using your smartphone or connect to your smart home assistant for voice-controlled use. Key Finders When you’re ready to head out the door, losing your keys can be frustrating. Now you can locate your keys and other essentials you misplace using your smartphone or tablet. Most key finders come with a two-piece system: one that attaches to the items you lose track of the most and one to keep on your person. Attach the device to your keys, the remote control or your wallet or purse. Smart Light Switch Don’t worry about fumbling around your home in the dark. Control the lights in your home using timers or voice command with the help of your smart home assistant or via an app on your smartphone. These devices not only help shine a light when you need it most, they can also help cut energy costs and promote home security while you’re away. Health Monitoring Sensors Remote health monitoring is a non-invasive, cost effective method to receive healthcare services from the comfort of your home. Wearable health monitoring sensors communicate physiological data directly to your healthcare providers in real-time. Monitoring sensors can be worn in a variety of accessories to track heart health, exercise activity, chronic conditions and more.

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A retiree’s guide to hosting on Airbnb

According to Airbnb, the number of experiences hosted by people 60 years and older has grown by nearly 1,100 percent over the past year. In fact, the United States tops Airbnb’s list of countries with the most hosts in that age group. Retiring (and aging as a whole) is sometimes associated with loneliness and withdrawal Read the rest here:   https://www.bankrate.com/retirement/retiree-guide-to-hosting-airbnb/

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How to Make and Pay for Home Modifications to Enable Aging in Place

Americans are living longer than ever before and enjoying a high quality of life unparalleled in the history of any country.  Your home is your castle and the last thing you want to do is live in a rental property or in a managed care facility.  Instead, many seniors are opting to age in place.  Technology and home renovation has come a long way allowing many modifications to be made to your home providing handicapped access.  Many of these modifications do not need to be expensive and can include things such as bathroom handle bars, water faucet handles, and door knobs.   Please visit the following page to learn more about making and paying for home modifications. https://www.payingforseniorcare.com/home-modifications/how-to-pay-for-home-mods.html

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Tips for Seniors Looking to Purchase a New Home

Update:  How to Make and Pay for Home Modifications to Enable Aging in Place According to the AARP, an estimated 90 percent of seniors wish to age in place. That is, they want to spend the rest of their days living in their own home rather than in an assisted living facility. However, the homes Americans raise their families in aren’t necessarily the best options for aging in place. Multi-story homes with large floor plans become difficult to navigate as a senior’s cognitive-motor skills deteriorate. This puts a lot of older people in a situation they haven’t been in for years: buying a new home. Seniors looking for a new home may have some catching up to do when it comes to the latest innovations in the real estate market, but in the end it is nothing they can’t handle. If you or someone you know is a senior looking to purchase a new home, take the following advice into account to ensure you find the best place to fit your needs. Finding the Right Home Back in the day, looking for a new home meant scouring over grainy curb photos in the newspaper and real estate bulletins then spending your weekend pounding the pavement to check out the interiors. Today, seniors can cut down on the amount of legwork and browse houses on the market from the comfort of their current homes. Online real estate listings provide a comprehensive description of a property along with interior photos and videos that create a virtual tour. From an online portal, interested parties can easily schedule a walk through if they like what they see in the profile. When looking for a home to spend their Golden Years in, seniors should seek certain features: ● One-story, flat floor plan ● Less square footage (for less overall upkeep) ● Neighborhoods with HOA services such as lawn care ● Location near hospitals and other health care services ● Showers and slip-resistant bathroom flooring ● Large windows and plentiful light ● Wide doors and hallways ● Retirement-friendly tax zoning Finding a Real Estate Agent While seniors can easily browse homes through online marketplaces, all homebuyers can benefit from the professional services of a real estate agent. When it comes to finding a place with all the necessary accessibility features, a real estate agent can zero in on the best options and get the inside scoop on properties that haven’t hit the market yet. When looking for a real estate agent, ask around for one that has experience working with seniors to find their perfect home for aging-in-place. The best real estate agents work within a niche market and know how to appeal to their demographics’ wants and needs. Call the Jones Team at RE/MAX Corridor (210) 414-8439. Financial Options for Senior Real Estate Buyers While selling their current home can help finance the purchase of a new property, some seniors may need additional financing to fund things such as accessibility modifications and smart home features. Most homeowners spend between $1,604 and $14,168 nationally for accessibility modifications. Since most seniors live on a fixed income, it’s important to find funding sources that have reasonable interest rates. Even better, applying for government grants can pay for renovations and those who receive them don’t have to pay anyone back at all. Medicare, Medicaid and veterans programs offer funding for those who qualify, as well. *** While most seniors want to age in place, most homes are not optimal when it comes to accessibility and safety. When searching for a new home, seniors should look for flat floor plans and a good location. A real estate agent that works in the retirement niche can help find the perfect house. While selling a current place can help fund the purchase of a new home, additional funds may be necessary for safety renovations. Loans, grants, and Medicare funding are all available for seniors who need it.

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After Losing A Spouse, A Senior Should Downsize

Losing your husband or wife was more difficult than words can convey. There is no way to describe the sudden loss you experienced, and living in the old house you two shared can make the healing process even more difficult. Not only does the place remind you of your spouse, it’s now too big for you. There are too many rooms to clean, and you have space that’s going unused. That’s why it can make sense to downsize after losing a spouse. By moving into a smaller home, you can save money and move forward. You can also use this as a time to declutter by only keeping what you really need. Why Seniors Should Downsize In This Case When it comes to downsizing your home, there are two main reasons why you should: finances and moving forward.   Bakerate.com shows why making a move to a smaller home can be a great financial decision for seniors. Take a big house that costs $250,000. By moving into one that costs $150,000, you can end up saving over $6,000 each year. When you’re a senior in retirement, the savings can really make life better for you. When you have recently lost your spouse, there’s another consideration. Staying in that old home can be a constant reminder of who you lost. This can delay or stop your grieving process and prevent you from moving past the mourning. When dealing with such a loss, moving forward is more important than ever. Remember that you’re not trying to forget the spouse — you’re only trying to move past the pain. Tips To Help Seniors Move More Easily After some thought and exploring your options, you’ve decided that downsizing has enough benefits to warrant trying it. You teamed up with a realtor and found the right home. It’s smaller, cheaper, and a great place to build new memories. Now you just have to pack.   Before you begin, you need to sort through your belongings. After all, you’re moving into a smaller place. You can’t bring everything with you.   When it comes to deciding what to pack and what to give away, an important key is to start early. Going through all your possessions takes time. Not only will you spend time reminiscing, you likely have many objects that you don’t need anymore. Donating these items can help you fit into your new space — and make moving easier.   Yourstoragefinder.com has some great tips on how seniors can pack for a move: Break packing into smaller jobs. This way, you don’t feel overwhelmed with having to box up everything in your kitchen at one time. Ask friends and family for help. Not only does this help make packing easier on you, it takes less time this way. This can be very helpful when trying to go through the possessions of your late spouse. Create an “Open First” box. Include all the things you’ll need immediately in your new home, such as medication, reading glasses, documents, and toiletries. The Problem With Alzheimer’s Deciding to downsize and sorting through your belongings are both daunting tasks, especially after the death of your spouse. But if you have problems with Alzheimer’s or dementia, these can become especially stressful. Change is not a friend of Alzheimer’s.   To help make this transition successful, the Mayo Clinic says to place familiar objects and photos around your new home. This can help remind you that you’re home if you get confused, and it also helps you feel at home. You Can Make This Move Moving to a new home is stressful. When you’ve lost a spouse, it can also lead to feeling bitter or afraid. But there are solid benefits for seniors who downsize their home. After you’ve decluttered your possessions, you can live more simply — and you can move forward with your life.  

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